reimagine immigration Logo

What is J1 visa?

The J-1 Exchange Visitor Visa is a non-immigrant visa issued by the U.S. Department of State, offering numerous opportunities for international individuals seeking to travel and gain experience in the United States.

Trainee program is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity

Requirements

Trainee Program

Intern

How does it work?

Apply for the vacancy

01

Apply for the vacancy

Premilinary interview

02

Premilinary interview

Interview with the employer

03

Interview with the employer

Work permit application

04

Work permit application

Consular interview

05

Consular interview

Arrive in the U.S. and begin to work

06

Arrive in the U.S. and begin to work

FAQS

The J-1 Visa encompasses 15 different categories, including the trainee category. This non-immigrant visa enables foreign individuals to participate in training programs with U.S.-based host organizations for a maximum duration of 18 months.

To be eligible, you must possess either a degree or professional certificate from a post-secondary academic institution recognized by the relevant ministry outside the United States, along with at least one year of relevant work experience in your occupational field gained outside the United States.

Alternatively, you may qualify if you have accumulated a minimum of five years of work experience in your occupational field outside the United States.

The J-1 Visa encompasses 15 categories, including the intern category specifically for foreign students and recent graduates.

This non-immigrant visa facilitates training opportunities with U.S.-based host organizations for a maximum period of 12 months. To qualify, you must meet one of the following criteria:

Be enrolled in a degree or certificate program at a post-secondary academic institution recognized by the relevant ministry outside the United States and actively pursuing your studies, OR have graduated from such an institution within the 12 months preceding the start date of your internship program.

On-the-job training emphasizes "learning by doing" and differs from traditional apprenticeships by being less structured and placing more responsibility on the individual to learn. International participants must actively engage in the learning process, with the host organization providing the "classroom" and tools while the participant takes the initiative to learn and be proactive.

In the U.S., overtime is typically earned after 40 hours per week, compensated at 1.5 times the base pay. Positions are classified as "exempt" or "non-exempt" based on fixed wages or actual hours worked, respectively. J-1 participants are classified the same as U.S. employees in their positions. "Exempt" employees aren't entitled to overtime, while "non-exempt" employees are eligible. Regulations may vary by organization and state.

Yes. There are no regulations that prohibit participants from earning a bonus during their program.

Individuals are permitted by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to stay in the United States for up to 30 days after the end date specified on their DS-2019 (Certificate of Eligibility). It is crucial to adhere to this regulation.

If a participant’s training program concludes before the DS-2019 end date, they should contact Cultural Vistas.

It is important to note that exceeding the authorized stay, even by one day, can result in severe penalties and hinder future visits to the United States.

If a participant wishes to travel within the United States for more than 30 days after completing their training program, they should exit the country and re-enter on a tourist visa. The specific requirements for tourist visas depend on the participant’s citizenship, and they should refer to the Department of State website for further information.

Please be aware that participants cannot continue to receive wages from their host employer beyond the last day of the training program specified on Form DS-2019. It is important to note that both the participant and the employer may face significant penalties if the participant is not legally authorized to receive wages from that employer.

The J-1 Visa is a temporary visa and is issued with the understanding that you do not intend to permanently reside in the U.S.

As part of Cultural Vistas’ sponsorship, both the participant and the host employer are required to sign an obligations and responsibilities form, affirming their commitment to maintaining the participant’s non-immigrant status.

Schools that frequently seek H1B or other visa statuses for their teachers may face limitations in their ability to collaborate with Cultural Vistas in the future.

The J-1 Visa is a temporary visa and is issued with the understanding that you do not intend to permanently reside in the U.S.

As part of Cultural Vistas’ sponsorship, both the participant and the host employer are required to sign an obligations and responsibilities form, affirming their commitment to maintaining the participant’s non-immigrant status.

Schools that frequently seek H1B or other visa statuses for their teachers may face limitations in their ability to collaborate with Cultural Vistas in the future.

Yes, it is possible under specific circumstances. Both trainees and interns can participate in additional training and internship programs if they focus on acquiring more advanced skills or explore a different field of expertise.

 

Interns can engage in additional internships as long as they remain enrolled as students or begin a new internship within 12 months of graduating.

 

Trainees, on the other hand, are eligible for additional training programs after residing outside the United States for a minimum of two years following their initial training program.

No. Participants who have successfully completed an internship program and no longer meet the selection criteria for internship programs must reside outside of the United States for two years before they can apply for a training position.

Reimagine Immigration can facilitate extensions for J-1 Visa programs, including on-the-job training and internships, for up to 12 or 18 months. A fee applies, and a training plan for the extended period is required. Approval typically takes 2-3 weeks, so it's recommended to request extensions before the original program end date. Contact info@reimagineimmigration.com to request an extension.

An exchange visitor is subject to the two‐year home-country physical presence requirement under the following conditions:

Your J‐1 Visa program is funded in whole or in part directly or indirectly by the U.S. government or the government of your nationality or last residence.

You are a national or permanent resident of a country that has deemed your field of specialized knowledge or skill necessary to the development of the country, as shown on the Exchange Visitor Skills List

Dependents must be spouses or children of the J‐1 Visa holder.

Common law marriages are not recognized and are not eligible for J‐2 Dependent Visas.

The age limit for dependents is 21.

Yes, J-2 Visa-dependent spouses can apply for work authorization in the United States through USCIS. They must demonstrate financial independence from the J-1 Visa participant. The application, submitted on Form I-765 with the required fee and a statement of family expenses, typically takes at least 60 days for processing. If approved, work authorization is valid until the J-1 Visa holder's authorized stay ends. J-2 dependents are subject to Social Security, federal unemployment, and income taxes, and reimagine immigration is not involved in their work authorization application.